My Frustrating Experience with Hired.com

Published Jul 11, 2017Last updated Dec 16, 2017
My Frustrating Experience with Hired.com

When I first started looking at Hired.com I found many positive reviews of the service.

I found this thread on Reddit. And other developers I respect spoke highly of their service.

With all that, I felt filling out a profile would be a good use of time.

I found the experience very disappointing.

A first glance, Hired.com seems to offer a good service, but after investing a significant amount of time filling out my profile, I was left extremely frustrated and disappointed.

What isn't clear at the beginning is that even after spending the 30-90 minutes to fill out your profile, you may never actually talk with a recruiter.

It's very possible that I'm still too inexperienced to get a job through Hired.com. I may suck a lot more than I realize. But in reading that some go through Hired.com straight out of a bootcamp, I thought my 2-4 years experience was plenty to land at least one interview.

Have things changed at Hired.com?

Out of all the experiences I read, no one mentioned going through what I did to get started.

I was left with the impression that folks were uploading a resume, completing a profile and then were quickly receiving interview requests.

I never got that far.

My Profile

I filled out the following details on my profile:

  • remote only
  • full time or contract
  • 60k CDN minimum salary
  • $40 / hour

I've worked on numerous solo projects, websites and large SaaS applications.

I'm very experienced with the full spectrum of front end work - CSS, JavaScript, including ES6 / Vue.js / React.js, etc.

I'm also experienced with Node.js, Socket.io, Laravel and WordPress. I'm not afraid of the backend, and have even designed several APIs.

Finally, my past co-workers speak well of me and my abilities. I'm not that green, and I work well with others.

Given my experience, I thought my numbers were actually a bit on the low end.

submitProfile()

After completing my profile, I had to wait several days to get any sort of response from Hired.com.

When I did receive a response it was a boilerplate message asking me to complete an online skills test using Codility.com.

Now, I actually liked the Codility platform. It was easy to use, and Codility itself offers a practice problem to help you get acclimated to their method of doing things.

For the challenge I had to complete two tasks.

One task was in parsing strings and another involved some basic math.

These aren't unlike the challenges I'm used to seeing on Free Code Camp.

I feel my answers were well written. I gave careful thought to making my code very readable, clear, and succinct.

My code passed all the tests provided by Codility to check my work.

But I failed the challenge.

Why?

I have no idea.

Cover all edge cases?

Codility does warn that their tests will only offer so much feedback. I was encouraged to consider all edge cases and possibilities in my code.

That's a tall order.

Again, perhaps I'm just too inexperienced, but I've only ever met developers that rely on tests, co workers and QA to find ALL possible edge cases.

Software dev, I believe, is a team sport, and weeding out candidates based how they perform in a vacuum doesn't seem very realistic.

Further, Hired.com can't tell me why I failed.

Yes, unfortunately it does not appear you passed the test this time around and will not be going live as of now. As for the exact results, I cannot specify more than passing/not passing. My apologies.

You will be eligible to retake the assessment six months after your initial attempt. I definitely encourage you to study up and give the test another go after that time. We'd be lucky to have you!

umm thanks?

Had I known I would have to take this test, and either pass / fail without any feedback whatsoever, I would have put my energies somewhere else - like with a company that allows me to actually talk to a human being.

Dude, do you even code?

The whole experience left me with the impression that Hired.com is full of Ivory tower elites that won't even condecend to mere mortals so we can reach our career goals, too.

On the surface they are helpful and approachable, but the walk isn't matching the talk.

If they are only interested in the top 10 that double majored in Math and Computer Science, fine, but at least be up front with that.

I'm fine with failure so long as I have the opportunity to improve.

The frustrating part of this whole experience is the complete lack of feedback.

I can take criticism.

I'm not so arrogant as to think my code is perfect, or that I know everything.

But give me a reason for the failure so I know what to fix.

Here are my answers:

https://codepen.io/patrickodacre/pen/mwKgwz/

https://codepen.io/patrickodacre/pen/pwKYWG

On Codility you can see an answer to this FAQ:

"I clicked ‘Run’ and it says “OK”. Will I score 100%?"

That’s not sufficient! Clicking ‘Run’ only verifies whether your code compiles and returns the correct result for the example test case. You need to make sure that your code works correctly and efficiently with all possible inputs.

I had 30 minutes per challenge. I managed to get things working for the tests provided, but I obviously missed something.

I would be thrilled if someone could point out what I did wrong.


What do you think?

Am I completely off-base?

Do I really just suck, or is this just another example of a really poor way to hire developers?

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